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This Privacy Policy describes how and when Times in Europe collects, uses and shares your information when you use our Services. Times in Europe receives your information through our website and from our partners and other third parties. For example, you send us information when you use Times in Europe from our website. When using any of our Services you consent to the collection, transfer, manipulation, storage, disclosure and other uses of your information as described in this Privacy Policy. Irrespective of which country you reside in or supply information from, you authorise Times in Europe to use your information in the United Kingdom and any other country where Times in Europe operates.

If you have any questions or comments about this Privacy Policy, please contact us at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Information Collected Upon Registration: When you create or reconfigure an Times in Europe account, you provide some personal information, such as your name, username, password, and email address. Some of this information, for example, your name and username, is listed publicly on our Services, including on your profile page, project page, and in search results. Some Services, such as search, public user profiles, and viewing projects, do not require registration.

Additional Information: If you offering links or comments, you may provide us with profile information to make public, such as a short biography, your location, your website, or a picture. We may use your contact information to send you information about our Services. You may use your account settings to unsubscribe from notifications from Times in Europe. You may also unsubscribe by following the instructions contained within the notification or the instructions on our website. If you email us, we may keep your message, email address and contact information to respond to your request. If you connect your Times in Europe account to your account on another service in order to cross-post between Times in Europe and that service, the other service may send us your registration or profile information on that service and other information that you authorise. This information enables cross-posting, helps us improve the Services, and is stored to provide a faster user experience.

Our services are primarily designed to show news and reviews in Europe and display 3rd party links to help fund the website. Some of the information you provide us is information you are asking us to make public. This includes comments and profile information.

Cookies: Like many websites, we use cookies and similar technologies to collect additional website usage data and to improve our Services, but we do not require cookies for many parts of our Services such as searching and looking at projects or project updates. A cookie is a small data file that is transferred to your computer's hard disk. Times in Europe may use both session cookies and persistent cookies to better understand how you interact with our Services, to monitor aggregate usage by our users and web traffic routing on our Services, and to customise and improve our Services. Most Internet browsers automatically accept cookies. You can instruct your browser, by changing its settings, to stop accepting cookies or to prompt you before accepting a cookie from the websites you visit. However, some Services may not function properly if you disable cookies.

Log Data: Our servers automatically record information ("Log Data") created by your use of the Services. Log Data may include information such as your IP address, browser type, operating system, the referring web page, pages visited, location, your mobile carrier, device and application IDs, search terms, and cookie information. We receive Log Data when you interact with our Services, for example, when you visit our websites, sign into our Services, interact with our email notifications, use your account to authenticate to a third-party website or application, or visit a third-party website that includes an Times in Europe button or widget. Tech News Europe uses Log Data to provide our Services and to measure, customise, and improve them.

Information Sharing and Disclosure

We do not disclose your private personal information except in the limited circumstances described here.

Your Consent: We may share or disclose your information at your direction. This information includes your name, email, username, and address. This information is only shared when explicitly requested by you.

Service Providers: We engage service providers to perform functions and provide services to us in the United Kingdom and abroad. We may share your private personal information with such service providers subject to confidentiality obligations consistent with this Privacy Policy, and on the condition that the third parties use your private personal data only on our behalf and pursuant to our instructions.

Business Transfers: In the event that Times in Europe is involved in a bankruptcy, merger, acquisition, reorganisation or sale of assets, your information may be sold or transferred as part of that transaction. The promises in this Privacy Policy will apply to your information as transferred to the new entity.

Modifying Your Personal Information

If you are a registered user of on our website, we provide you with tools and account settings to access or modify the personal information you provided to us and associated with your account.

Changes to this Policy

We may revise this Privacy Policy from time to time. The most current version of the policy will govern our use of your information and will always be at https://www.timesineurope.com/privacy. If we make a change to this policy that, in our sole discretion, is material, we will notify you via an email to the email address associated with your account. By continuing to access or use the Services after those changes become effective, you agree to be bound by the revised Privacy Policy.

Questions and Contact Information

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About Us

me ireland

Peter Flynn

Creator and designer

We are a team a small team providing European Tech News and UK Tech Reviews, we have a passion for Tech which we review on a regular basis on Times in Europe. We provide high quality information and advice and we are happy to share it with you.

Between myself, Simon Reeves (UK), Sam Leach (UK), Simone Dresler (Europe), Scott Johnson (US) and guest contributors we have many years of experience in IT related industries and have thrived on learning more and more about our Tech. I have had many years of experience writing for various publications but on a much smaller scale than this, I always try and specialise in one area of new tech but I can't help myself when I see something new and interesting I dive straight in and can't wait to try it out and write about, consequently I cover many areas but do try to stick to UK related stuff as this is my area of expertise. 

Simon comes from a creative tech background and is formerly a systems architect, his flair and attention to detail is very important to the success of this website. Simone is a freelance journalist who now prefers to work from home and has such a broad range of experience in reviewing and writing articles, we would not cope without her influence and ideas.

Scott is the most technical member of the team having worked 19 years in the tech industry and he is always out and about reviewing for us, sometimes I feel he should slow down a little, he is so productive and passionate, but he never wants to stop. That's our team in a nutshell.  

We have regular guest articles and always appreciate your input and you are welcome to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. with any enquiries that you may have. The website does contain link to various affiliates including Amazon UK which help to fund the website.

Our articles show the latest tech news, as we have journalists residing in the UK, Europe and US we mainly focus on these areas of the world.

I hope you enjoy our articles and if you wish to contribute or indeed join our team we would be happy to here from you, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.. Please feel free to add comments to enrich our website and having the interaction is important to us, all your comments will be appreciated - enjoy.

Will the US Introduce a National Privacy Law Anytime Soon?

Probably not before the next election. But keep an eye on this Congress as legislators debate how to define personal data and what limits to place on how companies use it. As we approach the one-year anniversary of Europe's General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR), Congress is again considering whether the United States should join Europe (and most major economies) by adopting some form of national data privacy and security regulation. In February, the House and Senate each held hearings on data privacy, and for the first time in years there appears to be at least some interest among the different stakeholders for national legislation. Why Are We Talking About National Privacy Regulation Now? Until recently, one major factor preventing a serious discussion about a national privacy law was the almost uniform opposition of Silicon Valley and the large tech companies. These companies were concerned that data privacy regulation would inhibit their ability to monetize the data they collect and prevent further innovation in the information sector. Recently, however, the industry has started to rethink that view. As abuses of data by major tech companies have come to light, Silicon Valley leaders have come to fear that data privacy legislation may be inevitable and have moved from a posture of opposing all legislation to seeking to shape the new regime. At the same time, the nation's first state-level generally applicable data privacy law, the California Consumer Privacy Act (CCPA), is scheduled to take effect in 2020. Several other states have proposed similar data privacy laws, causing businesses to grapple with the fact that they may shortly need to comply with a patchwork of complicated and conflicting state-level regulations. Advertisement Consumer groups, meanwhile, have long wanted more stringent data privacy rules in the United States. Ironically, they recently have become less interested in a national standard because they worry that the large tech companies will shape national legislation to reduce the levels of protections now being granted or contemplated at the state level. Thus, one of the core issues that Congress will need to consider is whether any new national privacy legislation preempts state law — essentially wiping out any state-level protections (as the business lobbies desire), or if instead it sets a floor for the minimum amount of data protection allowed while still allowing states to create their own, more stringent protections (as advocated by consumer groups). What Might Be in a US Privacy Law? Though it is highly unlikely that Congress would model any US law after GDPR or even the CCPA, it is likely that the debate about such a law would force Congress to address some of the same issues. For example, GDPR defines a series of "rights" that individuals maintain in data about them, such as the right to know what data companies hold about them, to correct that data, and to erase it in certain circumstances. Though the United States is unlikely to elevate these kinds of protections to the level of a "fundamental human rights" (as GDPR describes them), Congress will need to consider whether to grant individuals any power to determine how or when their data is used by companies. Similarly, the United States has so far avoided mandating general security standards and does not have a national data breach notification statute; instead, each state has its own such statute. A new privacy law might well include such a national standard. Advertisement Marvel Stuff Probably the two biggest challenges facing legislators considering a national privacy law is how to define personal data and what limits ought to be placed on how companies can use such data. The US has generally adopted a fairly narrow definition of personal data — including certain health information as well as Social Security numbers and key financial information, but excluding more general information about a person, such as their political, ethnic, or sexual identity. The tech industry would prefer a narrow definition so that it can continue to monetize the vast amounts of data it collects about activities and consumer preferences — such as reading habits, hobbies, friend groups, political affiliations, and even location data — without further regulation. Consumer groups seek to broaden the definition of personal data to prevent the kinds of practices that led to the recent Facebook scandals. Similarly, consumer groups aim to set clear limits on when and how companies can use personal data. GDPR, for example, only allows the processing of personal data if the company has one of six enumerated legal bases for doing so. US law is unlikely to be quite so restrictive but will need to find some method of describing what companies are allowed to do (or at least what they are not allowed to do). How Would a National Privacy Law Be Enforced? Once the contours of the restrictions are determined, Congress will then need to determine how the new privacy law will be enforced. To date, regulation of data privacy and security issues have either fallen to special agencies enforcing industry-specific privacy regulations (such as Health and Human Services, which enforces HIPAA violations, or the bank regulators, which enforce Gramm-Leach-Bliley violations) or to other federal agencies using their preexisting regulatory authority. Thus, the Federal Trad Commission has brought privacy and security actions pursuant to its authority to promote consumer protection, and the Securities and Exchange Commission has brought enforcement actions against public companies pursuant to its regulatory authority over public companies. A new federal privacy law would create a much clearer regulatory regime and potentially a new regulator to enforce it. More controversially, consumer groups would like to guarantee that any privacy regulation allows for an individual right of action to ensure that individuals can force companies to abide by privacy regulations even in the absence of government action. It is probably unlikely that a new national privacy law will be passed before the next election, but it is worth keeping an eye on this Congress, as it may begin to shape the future of privacy and security law in the United States.

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